Archives

Are You Ready for Anything? Three Action Items to Check Your Emergency Preparedness

What’s your worst-case scenario? Fire? Explosion? Flood? If you’re just thinking of the disaster itself, you’re not thinking broadly enough: the true worst-case scenario is a disaster for which your facility and your workers are completely unprepared.

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Taking Action: Systemic Violence & Employer Preparedness

VividLearning

Complimentary Webcast: Taking Action: Systemic Violence & Employer Preparedness
Wednesday, August 10, 2016 at 2pm EDT

Sponsored by

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EPCRA Catching Up to GHS

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) premier chemical right-to-know reporting regulation is about to catch up its Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) counterpart.

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Dirty Rags: How to Get Rid of Them

Over 2.2 billion solvent-contaminated rags are used in workplaces in the United States on an annual basis. It is no surprise then that environment, health, and safety (EHS) managers must contend with requirements from both the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for managing these rags. Yesterday we reviewed how OSHA wants you to deal with rags. Today we will take a look at options under the EPA for handling solvent-contaminated rags (or wipes, as the Agency refers to them).

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Haws® Introduces New Bottle Fillers to Extensive Hydration Line

[Sparks, Nevada, USA]- Haws® is pleased to announce the launch of multiple new Bottle Fillers to its existing bottle filler and drinking fountain product lines. The 1920 and 3377BF is a versatile, satin-finish bottle filler with push button operated stainless steel valve offering simple installation, compact size and low maintenance. Both units are certified to NSF 61 & 372; Federal Safe Water Drinking Act, CA Health & Safety Code 116875 with 100% lead free waterways and 1GPM (3.78LPM) laminar flow.

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California Appeals Board: Was Workers’ Exposure Willful?

What’s your procedure for handling workers’ complaints about health symptoms?

Some health symptoms are “nonspecific,” meaning they can have more than one possible cause. A headache, for example, can result from exposure to hazardous airborne chemicals—or the worker could be coming down with a cold or might have skipped lunch. It’s important to carefully investigate any symptoms your workers report, especially if you get multiple reports from multiple employees.

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OSHA Tips for Heat Exposure

By John E. Hall

With much of the country in line for more high temperatures as summer winds down, employers should be mindful of employees’ exposure to heat hazards on the job. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has no heat standard, the agency has become increasingly willing to cite employers for employees’ heat exposure under Section 5(A)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act), commonly known as the General Duty Clause.

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The Role of Employee Engagement in a Safety Culture

By Eric Svendsen, PhD, Principal, safetyBUILT-IN

One thing successful safety leaders do to help build a stronger safety culture in the organization is to build levels of employee engagement.  An engaged employee thinks and acts like an owner, and because of that, they not only remain safer on the job, but they are also much more likely to help you lead a safety culture.

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Opinion: OSHA Discourages Blanket Postaccident Drug Testing

By Al Vreeland

OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule, finalized in May, requires certain employers to submit injury and illness data to OSHA. But it also includes provisions intended to prevent employers from retaliating against employees who report injuries, among them a caution against postaccident drug testing. Here’s what guest columnist Al Vreeland thinks about the agency’s move:

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Dirty Rags: Don’t Leave Them Lying Around

Over 2.2 billion solvent-contaminated rags are used in workplaces in the United States on an annual basis. It is no surprise then that environment, health, and safety (EHS) managers must contend with requirements from both the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for managing these rags. Today we will review how OSHA wants you to deal with rags, and tomorrow we will take a look at options under the EPA for managing solvent-contaminated rags.

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