Category: Recordkeeping

electronic reporting recordkeeping filing

OSHA Delays Injury and Illness Reporting Deadline

On May 17, OSHA announced that it has delayed the July 1 filing deadline for injury and illness electronic reporting. The new filing deadline has yet to be determined, and no reason has been given yet for the postponement.

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Q&A: Recording Employee Illnesses

Recently, a subscriber asked the following question: We have recently had two medical issues that required us to send the employees to the hospital. One passed out and collapsed from pneumonia, and the other had a potential TIA. Do either of these qualify as OSHA recordable accidents?

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Q&A: Industrial Hygiene Surveys

Recently, a subscriber asked us the following question: How long should industrial hygiene surveys be kept on file? This was our response:

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Training Records: How to Choose an LMS that Works for You

Keeping track of training is an essential task for environment, health, and safety (EHS) managers, but it can be time-consuming and difficult to keep up with. Enter learning management systems (LMSs), electronic databases specifically designed for tracking employee training and continuing education. But if you’ve ever chosen or had to work with a poorly designed, […]

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Training Records: Here’s What Your Electronic Recordkeeping System Can Do for You

So your forklift operator forgot his training and rolled off a loading dock. Or maybe your roofing crew members got careless and didn’t wear their fall protection. Or perhaps your supervisor was in a hurry and didn’t check the air in the tank before sending workers in. Whatever happened, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration […]

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Opinion: OSHA Discourages Blanket Postaccident Drug Testing

By Al Vreeland OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping rule, finalized in May, requires certain employers to submit injury and illness data to OSHA. But it also includes provisions intended to prevent employers from retaliating against employees who report injuries, among them a caution against postaccident drug testing. Here’s what guest columnist Al Vreeland thinks about the […]

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