Category: Special Topics in Safety Management

Safety is a process, and as such, needs to be managed. This section offers resources to create a viable safety program, sell it to senior management, train supervisors and employees in using it, and then track and report your progress. Look also for ways to advance your own skills in these areas, both for your current job, and those that follow.

Free Special Report: 50 Tips for More Effective Safety Training

The Air Force’s Innovative Safety App

The Air Force has high hopes for its Airman Safety App, described as a simple, web-based tool that provides a streamlined process for Airmen and others to report safety issues as they encounter them. A recent update to the tool, developed by the Air Force Safety Center, will enhance voluntary reporting capacity for safety issues […]

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Businesses Create Interactive Protective Equipment

Two Minnesota-based companies are working to help safety professionals predict and prevent possible job hazards. Safety gear maker Ergodyne and platform developer Corvex Connected Safety are connecting smart personal protective equipment (PPE) to a platform that shares real-time data, insights, and safety risk concerns from and with workers connected to the gear.

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When Domestic Violence Enters the Workplace: A Clear and Present Danger

While coworkers can often be the perpetrators of workplace violence, employers also must be aware of external threats from domestic abusers. If an employee reports that he or she is experiencing abuse at home, awareness and sensitivity on the part of the employer goes a long way. It’s a situation all too familiar to Lynn […]

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Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: An Irreversible Health Issue that Is Preventable

At least 22 million employees will experience workplace noise at potentially damaging levels this year. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), occupational hearing loss is the most common U.S. work-related illness in manufacturing. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that $242 million is spent on workers’ compensation for […]

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Prevent violence

OSHA’s Take on Preventing Workplace Violence

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has no standard or regulation specifically addressing workplace violence, but employers’ responsibility to address violence is covered under the General Duty Clause of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. And that means employers need to be ready for the agency’s inspection and enforcement efforts.

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