Category: Special Topics in Safety Management

Safety is a process, and as such, needs to be managed. This section offers resources to create a viable safety program, sell it to senior management, train supervisors and employees in using it, and then track and report your progress. Look also for ways to advance your own skills in these areas, both for your current job, and those that follow.

Free Special Report: 50 Tips for More Effective Safety Training

marijuana in prescription bottle

Medical Marijuana and Workplace Safety Tips from Safety 2017

On Tuesday, June 20, at Safety 2017, the annual professional development conference and exposition of the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), Fred Kohanna, M.D., MBA, spoke to a crowded room of safety professionals about the workplace safety implications of medical marijuana in a session titled “Medical Marijuana: Miracle Drug or Safety Nightmare?”

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Tips for an Ergonomic Workstation

Many of us spend hours at our workstations every day. Bad habits and incorrect posture can lead to neck and back pain or sore wrists and fingers. Proper ergonomics can help you stay comfortable at work.

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summer time

Keeping Your Young Summer Workers Safe

Those high school and college kids your company has added to the payroll for the summer are somebody’s children. Take steps to protect them just as you’d protect permanent employees.

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3D printing printer filament

The Potential Risks of 3D Printers

The decreased cost and increased attention to three-dimensional, or 3D, printing has led to questions about the safety and potential health effects of these devices. New research published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene found that common filaments used in the printers can emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the printing process. According […]

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Chicken!

Tyson Foods Pushing for Job Safety and Health

The poultry giant Tyson Foods is taking steps to create “a better workplace,” which includes enhanced safety and health protection for 95,000 U.S. employees. Keep reading to find out what’s likely to change.

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