Tag: GHS

GHS or DOT—Which Label Should You Use?

What’s the relationship between labeling under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) and the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) labeling requirements? Which label must you use? Can you use both? Today we will help answer these questions, and tomorrow we will offer some placarding tips for shipments of DOT-regulated hazardous […]

But It Wasn’t Flammable Before! GHS Changed the Meaning of ‘Flammable Liquids’

A chemical that meets the definition of “flammable” requires special precautions in handling, use, transfer, and storage. But the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has changed the definition of “flammable” throughout its general industry and construction standards to align them with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Most employers […]

The June 1 GHS Safety Data Sheet Deadline Has Come … and Gone. Are You Prepared for the New SDSs?

Are you ready for the new safety data sheets (SDS)? Writing for Safety.BLR.com®, Safety Editor Emily Clark has everything you need to know about the recently passed deadline and its implications. June 1, 2015, marked an important deadline in the 4-year phase-in period for OSHA’s revisions to its hazard communication standard. Effective that date, chemical […]

Fertile Soil for Safety: OSHA’s Ammonium Nitrate Storage Rules

The earliest recorded disaster involving ammonium nitrate (AN) occurred on April 16, 1947, in Texas City, Texas. A transport vessel loaded with 2,600 tons of AN caught fire; when the fire spread to the sealed storage hold, the transport exploded, killing 581 people—including all but one member of the Texas City Fire Department. We’ve known […]

Fertile Soil for Safety: OSHA, EPA, and Industry Address Fertilizer Safety

On April 17, 2013, fire broke out in a wooden warehouse at West Fertilizer Company in West, Texas. As the town’s volunteer fire department mobilized to respond, 30 tons of ammonium nitrate (AN) fertilizer in an adjacent wooden warehouse exploded. Fifteen people died, including 12 volunteer firefighters. An apartment building, many houses, and a nursing […]

A Label for All Seasons … and All Situations

In yesterday’s article, we looked at the labeling requirements for solid materials, specifically, when a solid material is an “article” that does not require labeling and when it is a potentially hazardous chemical that must be labeled. Today, we’ll look at other unusual labeling situations that may arise and how to handle them.