Tag: PEL

Lead Exposure

OSHA’s 40-Year-Old Lead Standard Is Far Short of Protective

Worker safety advocates, scientists, and some state OSHA authorities have been contending for years that OSHA’s permissible exposure levels (PELs) for lead in the workplace are inadequate to protect workers from the multiple adverse health effects associated with the metal.

Protecting Workers from Lead Exposure Would Have Saved This Employer from Additional Citations

At a municipal storage facility in Danville, Pennsylvania, a painting contractor was conducting abrasive blasting to remove paint from water tanks. An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection showed that the workers were overexposed to airborne lead—and to other airborne contaminants as well. If the employer had paid attention to its lead compliance, it […]

These Workers Were Overexposed to Lead … By Any Standard

At a municipal storage facility in Danville, Pennsylvania, a painting contractor was conducting abrasive blasting to remove paint from water tanks. An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection showed that the workers were overexposed to airborne lead. As a result, OSHA issued several serious and willful violations against the employer for violations of the […]

The Rules Have Changed: How Are OSHA’s Two New Silica Rules Different?

OSHA’s new final rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica is actually two rules: the Agency published its maritime/general industry and construction rules concurrently. The rules are very similar, but there are some differences in their scope, compliance requirements, and compliance dates. Here’s an overview of the differences between the two rules.

The Rules Have Changed: What’s in OSHA’s New Silica Rule?

On March 25, 2016, OSHA published its final rule on Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica. Since 1971, crystalline silica exposures have been subject to a permissible exposure limit found in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-3; the new rule establishes a substance-specific standard for crystalline silica. Substance-specific standards include extensive compliance requirements not found in […]

Are the Feds Giving the Brick Industry the Dust Off? (Continued)

Could a one-two punch from the federal government decimate a major American industry? Yesterday we looked at new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements and cost controversies for controlling air pollution at brick and ceramic manufacturing plants. Today we will review the impact that OSHA’s silica dust rule will have on EHS management tasks at such […]

What Happens When You Don’t Protect Your Workers from Lead Exposure

A company in Waverly, Ohio, was recently fined over $56,000 for violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) lead standard concerning exposure monitoring and the use of personal protective equipment. Today we will review the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for lead, take a look at what happened in this particular case, and urge […]

Understand the Hazards of Silica

Each year, more than 300 American workers die from silicosis, and thousands of new cases are diagnosed. Silicosis is the name given to incurable lung damage that occurs when workers inhale dusts that contain crystalline silica. Silica comes in different forms, but crystalline silica is the type that causes scarring in the lungs. Crystalline silica […]