Enforcement and Inspection

As today’s workplace becomes more complex, regulation of that workplace increases. In this section, you’ll find the practical advice you need to understand exactly what OSHA, other federal agencies, and their state counterparts, require of you, and to comply in the ways that best satisfy both your and their needs. Look also for important court decisions, advice on how to handle enforcement actions, and news of upcoming changes in workplace health and safety law.

Free Special Report: What to Expect from an OSHA Inspection


Multiple Fatality Cases Settled with Goodyear

The deaths of four employees over a one-year period at a Danville manufacturing plant have resulted in a substantial settlement and fines for one of the most well-known tire makers in the world. Keep reading to find out what makes this settlement deal so unique.

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Tragic Fatality Leads to Big Fines in Alaska

The Alaska OSHA program has come down hard on an Anchorage contractor for a tragic incident that didn’t have to happen. Find out what lengths this employer went to in order to avoid its legal duty to provide a safe and healthful workplace.

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Trailer Manufacturer Fined … Big Time

A well-known Oklahoma trailer maker is facing more than a half-million dollars in penalties. Keep reading to learn what OSHA inspectors discovered when an employee complaint caught their attention.

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Cracking Down on “Indifferent Employers”: Increased OSHA Scrutiny for Severe Violators

In 2012, the Henry RAC Holding Corporation—a New Jersey-based rifle manufacturer—was labeled by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as a “severe violator,” and placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program (SVEP). As a result, the company was subject to follow-up inspections by OSHA. In a 2016 follow-up inspection, OSHA cited the company for additional repeat and serious violations.

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Cracking Down on “Indifferent Employers”: How OSHA Identifies Severe Violators

At Lauren Manufacturing in New Philadelphia, Ohio, an employee accidentally sliced off her own finger as she was cutting rubber material using a bench cutter. An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigation showed that it was the second debilitating injury at the plant in 18 months, and it identified four repeat violations of OSHA standards. Not only was the employer cited for six serious and four repeat violations, they were also placed in OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

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Multiple Employers Mean Multiple Liability: What Are Your Obligations?

Yesterday we looked briefly at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) criteria for deciding when it will cite multiple employers at a single worksite for the same hazardous condition. Today we’ll take a closer look at the different categories of employers that OSHA may cite.

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Multiple Employers Means Multiple Liability: Could You Be Cited?

On June 18, 2016, workers for three different employers were troubleshooting a problem with the drill string at an oil well in Watford City, North Dakota, when a hydrocarbon release resulted in an explosion and flash fire. One worker was killed, three workers were injured—and all three employers were cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for their role in the incident.

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Civil Penalty Amounts Increased by OSHA

The U.S. Department of Labor published a final rule in the Federal Register that increases penalty amounts to adjust for inflation across its various agencies, including OSHA. The penalty increases are effective as of January 13, 2017.

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Report Reveals Environmental Violations Top Federal Crimes List

Surprisingly, the most common federal crime committed by an “organizational offender” in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 was environmental, according to a recent report from the United States Sentencing Commission. The average fine for an organizational offender was almost $23 million. Let’s take a closer look at the report and draw a couple of takeaway points for environment, health, and safety (EHS) managers.

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Excavation Hazards at School Site Lead to Citation

Acting on a complaint in June 2016, the OSHA found employees of one of the area’s largest general contractors working in an unprotected 10-foot deep excavation at a suburban New Jersey high school, in violation of federal safety and health laws. As a result, OSHA issued citations for nine violations—one willful and eight serious—to the New York-based general contractor, which specializes in sports facility design and construction. The company faces $197,752 in fines as a result.

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