Training

Training is the number one element in accident, incident, and illness avoidance. Check the articles here frequently for the latest and best tips on techniques, trends, programs and equipment. We offer explanations for group, one-one, or self-directed situations, in both general and specific work activities. Your training will be both easier and more effective if you do.


Countdown to Stand-Down: Take Action for a Successful Stand-Down

It’s time to take action as you plan a stand-down to boost awareness and prevent injuries and fatalities. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the U.S. Air Force, the National Safety Council, and other partners are joining OSHA in an effort to reach five million workers through the 2016 Safety Stand-Down May 2-6. While the focus is primarily on falls in construction, employers in any industry are encouraged to participate.

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Q&A: Who Can Provide Training?

Recently, we received the following question from a subscriber:

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April is Hispanic Safety Month in Nevada

The state of Nevada is bringing attention to the issue of Hispanic worker safety by designating April as Hispanic Safety Month. Find out more about the risks and remedies to help protect this vulnerable worker population.

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Final Rule Released to Simplify Lead Paint Program Training

In an effort to cut the cost of complying with EPA’s lead-based paint (LBP) program, the Agency has issued a final rule simplifying refresher training under the lead renovation, repair, and paining (RRP) rule and removed the jurisdiction-specific certification and accreditation requirement under the LBP activities rule in states where the Agency implements that rule. Currently, the EPA implements the LBP activities rule in 11 states.

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Records, or It Didn’t Happen! A Training Records Checkup

During an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection, the inspector will ask to see a lot of written materials, including any records you have of training that has been provided to employees. If you don’t have the records—or if something is missing—OSHA is likely to cite you not for missing records but for failing to provide training at all. Unless you’ve kept written records, OSHA will figure it just didn’t happen.

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Q&A: OSHA 10-Hour Training

Recently, one of our subscribers asked the following question:

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OSHA 101

By Bridget Miller

While OSHA is practically a household word, not everyone knows how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is administered or what powers it has. Let’s take a look.

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Safety and Health Curriculum Coming to U.S. Classrooms

In addition to math, social studies, and English, some students in grades 7 through 12 will participate in an interactive teaching module titled Safety Matters. Find out who’s bringing the safety message into the classroom and why.

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Infographic: Can Technology Make Safety Simpler?

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BLR recently partnered with ProntoForms to survey 500+ safety pros to see if technology can make safety simpler and more effective. This new infographic offers insight into the results. (Note: You can download survey results here.)

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New NIOSH Resources Focus on Hispanic Workers

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently released a series of illustrated communication products targeted to Spanish-speaking immigrant workers to help them understand their rights to a safe workplace. The materials, titled Protéjase en el trabajo (Protect yourself at work), include four brochures, five short videos, and two posters encouraging immigrant workers to know and exercise their rights to workplace safety and health.

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