Injuries and Illness

How to Minimize the Impact of Flu Season on Your Workplace

There’s a lot you can do to prevent flu from invading your workplace, making your employees sick, increasing the risk of accidents, and creating havoc with work schedules. Here are some recommendations from Flu.gov.

Flu.gov, a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website, recommends that businesses take the following steps to keep employees from getting sick with flu:

  • Promote vaccination. Encourage all employees to get vaccinated for seasonal flu. Make sure your employees know where they and their family can get seasonal flu vaccination in the community. Find out about health providers, pharmacies or clinics that offer seasonal flu vaccinations in your community. Partner with a pharmacy or provider to get your employees vaccinated. Or, if possible, offer seasonal flu vaccination opportunities right at your workplace.
  •  Educate employees to recognize the symptoms of flu.  Symptoms of flu include fever or chills and cough or sore throat. In addition, symptoms of flu can include runny nose, body aches, headache, tiredness, diarrhea, or vomiting. Workers who have flu-like symptoms should be asked to go home. Continue to advise workers to check for any signs of illness before coming to work each day.   

No time to write safety meeting materials? You don’t need to with the 50 prewritten safety meeting modules in BLR’s Safety Meeting Repros program. All meetings are ready to use, right out of the box. Try it completely at our expense! PLUS get a free report! Get the details.


  • Encourage hand cleanliness by providing education and reminders about the importance of frequent hand washing. Make sure all employees have easy access to running water and soap or alcohol-based hand cleaners.
  • Encourage “respiratory etiquette” by providing education and reminders about covering coughs and sneezes with tissues, and easy access to tissues and trash cans.
  • Promote routine cleaning of surfaces and items that are more likely to have frequent hand contact. Provide employees with cleaning agents.
  • Prepare for employees to stay home from work and extend the time sick employees stay home to at least 7 days. People who are still sick after 7 days should continue to stay home until at least 24 hours after symptoms have gone away, even if they feel better sooner. Employees may stay home because they are sick, are at higher risk for complications, need to care for sick household members, or because schools have been dismissed or childcare centers have closed and they need to care for their children. Review sick-leave policies and consider making them flexible and consistent with public health recommendations. 

Examine Safety Meeting Repros completely at our expense. Send no money. Take no risk. Get a FREE report. Get more info.


Training for Under $6 a Session

With the new year just around the corner, it’s time to think about the coming year’s safety training. You’ll probably need to plan for make-up sessions, since there are sure to be some employees out sick with the flu at the time of scheduled training.

We can help you to make sure that nobody misses required safety training with a resource that makes training, including make-up sessions, easy and effective.

Our Safety Meeting Repros provides you with 50 completely turnkey safety meeting modules, each responsive to a key OSHA regulation, with trainee materials in reproducible form. Just check off the outline items as you proceed through the meeting and you won’t miss a single point of importance. Then follow up with the fully prepared quiz (with instantly available answers) and illustrated handouts that also come with each lesson. You’ve completed a full training cycle, with little more work than running a copier, at a cost equivalent of under $6 a session.

We don’t think you can appreciate how much this program can ease your training task without looking it over. We invite you to do so at no cost (we’ll even pay any return shipping) and no risk. Here’s how you can arrange a trial run, at our expense.

More Articles on Injuries and Illness

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How to Minimize the Impact of Flu Season on Your Workplace

There’s a lot you can do to prevent flu from invading your workplace, making your employees sick, increasing the risk of accidents, and creating havoc with work schedules. Here are some recommendations from Flu.gov.

Flu.gov, a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website, recommends that businesses take the following steps to keep employees from getting sick with flu:

  • Promote vaccination. Encourage all employees to get vaccinated for seasonal flu. Make sure your employees know where they and their family can get seasonal flu vaccination in the community. Find out about health providers, pharmacies or clinics that offer seasonal flu vaccinations in your community. Partner with a pharmacy or provider to get your employees vaccinated. Or, if possible, offer seasonal flu vaccination opportunities right at your workplace.
  •  Educate employees to recognize the symptoms of flu.  Symptoms of flu include fever or chills and cough or sore throat. In addition, symptoms of flu can include runny nose, body aches, headache, tiredness, diarrhea, or vomiting. Workers who have flu-like symptoms should be asked to go home. Continue to advise workers to check for any signs of illness before coming to work each day.   

No time to write safety meeting materials? You don’t need to with the 50 prewritten safety meeting modules in BLR’s Safety Meeting Repros program. All meetings are ready to use, right out of the box. Try it completely at our expense! PLUS get a free report! Get the details.


  • Encourage hand cleanliness by providing education and reminders about the importance of frequent hand washing. Make sure all employees have easy access to running water and soap or alcohol-based hand cleaners.
  • Encourage "respiratory etiquette" by providing education and reminders about covering coughs and sneezes with tissues, and easy access to tissues and trash cans.
  • Promote routine cleaning of surfaces and items that are more likely to have frequent hand contact. Provide employees with cleaning agents.
  • Prepare for employees to stay home from work and extend the time sick employees stay home to at least 7 days. People who are still sick after 7 days should continue to stay home until at least 24 hours after symptoms have gone away, even if they feel better sooner. Employees may stay home because they are sick, are at higher risk for complications, need to care for sick household members, or because schools have been dismissed or childcare centers have closed and they need to care for their children. Review sick-leave policies and consider making them flexible and consistent with public health recommendations. 

Examine Safety Meeting Repros completely at our expense. Send no money. Take no risk. Get a FREE report. Get more info.


Training for Under $6 a Session

With the new year just around the corner, it’s time to think about the coming year’s safety training. You’ll probably need to plan for make-up sessions, since there are sure to be some employees out sick with the flu at the time of scheduled training.

We can help you to make sure that nobody misses required safety training with a resource that makes training, including make-up sessions, easy and effective.

Our Safety Meeting Repros provides you with 50 completely turnkey safety meeting modules, each responsive to a key OSHA regulation, with trainee materials in reproducible form. Just check off the outline items as you proceed through the meeting and you won’t miss a single point of importance. Then follow up with the fully prepared quiz (with instantly available answers) and illustrated handouts that also come with each lesson. You’ve completed a full training cycle, with little more work than running a copier, at a cost equivalent of under $6 a session.

We don’t think you can appreciate how much this program can ease your training task without looking it over. We invite you to do so at no cost (we’ll even pay any return shipping) and no risk. Here’s how you can arrange a trial run, at our expense.

More Articles on Injuries and Illness

Print