Back to Basics, Construction, ESG, Fire Safety, Heat illness

Back to Basics: Best of 2022

As the year comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at some of our highlights from 2022. Today, we’re sharing some of our favorite Back to Basics articles from this year.

The Fundamentals of ESG

The modern workplace is changing because of many different factors, including the COVID-19 pandemic, the Great Resignation, and younger generations entering the workforce. Employees are demanding more from companies, in terms of what the company can do for them, and within a broader social context. To deal with this shift in values, employers are turning to metrics such as environmental, social, and governance (ESG) impact to create a more sustainable workplace for everyone. Lawyer Adele Abrams and senior risk control consultant Abby Ferri discussed ESG in a recent webinar to provide more context behind the idea, and how employers should be implementing it at their companies.

Read the full article here and view the accompanying infographic here.

Women in EHS

In recent years, EHS leaders have been shifting focus towards becoming more sustainable and embracing concepts such as Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG). The social component of ESG aims to bring subjects to the table that in the past would have been handled by the human resources (HR) department, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Gender equality in EHS is becoming a greater topic of conversation among safety professionals, and it is important for leaders to understand the legitimate issues that women face in EHS work environments.

Read the full article here and view the accompanying infographic here.

Heat Stress and Illness Prevention and Protection

As summer begins and temperatures rise, EHS leaders and management must protect their workers from the dangers of heat stress and illness. According to OSHA, thousands of workers get sick and even die from occupational heat exposure, despite it being entirely preventable. Hazardous heat exposure can occur anytime, both indoors and outdoors, and the occupational risk factors for heat illness include heavy physical activity, high temperatures in the work environment, lack of heat acclimatization, and wearing insulating clothing.

Read the full article here and view the accompanying infographic here.

Suicide Prevention in Construction

This week, September 5-9, 2022, is Construction Suicide Prevention Week. OSHA created this week back in 2020 in partnership with many sponsors in the construction industry in order to raise awareness about the high number of suicides in construction, and to provide resources to help prevention efforts.

Read the full article here and view the accompanying infographic here.

Ergonomic Hazards and Solutions

Ergonomics is defined by OSHA as “fitting a job to a person,” and it can help lessen muscle fatigue, increase productivity, and reduce the number and severity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). MSDs affect the muscles, nerves, blood vessels, ligaments, and tendons. Workers in all kinds of industries are exposed to risk factors for MSDs, such as heavy lifting, bending, reaching overhead, pushing and pulling heavy loads, working in awkward body postures, and repetitive task completion.

Read the full article here and view the accompanying infographic here.

Fire Safety and Prevention

This week, October 9-15, is Fire Prevention Week. This national week of observance is the longest-running public health observance in United States history, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Fire Prevention Week was started by President Calvin Coolidge in 1925 as a way to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, which killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and more than 2,000 acres of land. Fire safety is everyone’s responsibility in the workplace, says OSHA.

Read the full article here and view the accompanying infographic here.