Tag: NIOSH

Flight attendant

Pregnant Flight Crewmembers Face Unique Hazard: Cosmic Radiation

Working as a flight crewmember can put a pregnancy at risk, particularly during the first trimester, notes the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). NIOSH points to three hazards that could imperil a pregnancy—circadian rhythm disruption (jet lag) or shiftwork, physical job demands, and cosmic ionizing radiation.

Tree care worker

Taking Care of Tree Care Workers: OSHA Recommendations

Tree care operations are among the most hazardous in the U.S. workforce. Nationally, landscape service workers make up less than 1 percent of the workforce but constitute 3.5 percent of all workplace fatalities, according to the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, and 75 percent of all fatalities are related to tree removal or […]

indoor shooting/firing range

Indoor Firing Range Employees Face Increased Lead Exposure

With the recognition that exposure to lead in the workplace can cause a host of short- and long-term illnesses, many industrial sectors have phased out its use and found substitutes. That still leaves many other sectors—at least 22, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)—where workers are more likely to inhale […]

Firefighter

Firefighters and Rhabdo: NIOSH Fact Sheets

Firefighters—whether they are working in burning buildings or burning forests—can experience a dangerous condition called rhabdomyolysis or rhabdo. Rhabdo is the breakdown of damaged muscle tissue that releases proteins and electrolytes into the blood. These substances can damage the heart and kidneys and cause permanent disability and even death. The condition can occur for many […]

NIOSH Recommends Exposure Limits, Controls for Flavoring Chemicals

Have you enjoyed a tasty cup of flavored coffee or delicious hot buttery popcorn lately? That rich flavor probably came from an extracted and concentrated form of one or more naturally occurring chemical substances—substances that, in their pure chemical form, have the very chemical-sounding names of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione.