Tag: OSHA inspections

Drone

Eye in the Sky: What to Know About OSHA’s Use of Drones During Inspections

In May 2018, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a memorandum permitting the use of drones to inspect workplaces under certain circumstances. Since that time, OSHA has used unmanned aircraft systems (UASs or drones ) in a number of investigations, and their use is expected to become more common in the future.

OSHA safety concept

10 OSHA Myths That Still Impact Attitudes Toward Safety

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sets and enforces safety standards for the workplace. It’s a simple job description but a huge undertaking. And given that negative attitudes toward the agency are pervasive among U.S. employers and workers, OSHA’s authority has taken on an almost mythical quality, and many misconceptions about the agency’s powers […]

Safety inspection, OSHA inspector

OSHA Enforcement Roundup Includes Fall Hazards, Silica

OSHA inspections were up in 2019, and the trend of aggressive enforcement shows no sign of abatement any time soon. Take a look at some of the more significant enforcement cases from the past several months for a snapshot of OSHA’s recent inspection priorities. From fall hazards to silica and beyond, these cases illustrate the […]

Safety inspection, citations

Safety 2019: Successfully Navigate Your Next OSHA Inspection

If OSHA knocked on your door, how would you respond? Would you throw open the doors to your facility and give the inspector free reign, or would you demand that the inspector obtain a warrant before entering? That decision—and the many others that take place throughout the course of an OSHA inspection—can have a major […]

OSHA, Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Is OSHA Enforcement Really Declining?

The National Employment Law Project claimed Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforcement activity has declined in the past two years. The report, “Workplace Safety Enforcement Continues to Decline in Trump Administration,” points to a low number of OSHA inspectors as the primary cause. The full picture, however, is likely more complicated.