Tag: per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances

Groundwater, water pump

EPA Tackles PFAS Levels for Groundwater with Guidance Draft

In February 2019, the EPA issued its Action Plan for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The Plan listed five priority actions and four short-term actions to address “key PFAS-related challenges.” One of the priority actions is to provide guidance for groundwater cleanup at sites contaminated with the two PFAS that have prompted the most concern—perfluorooctanoic […]

Drinking water

Michigan Will Take Action on MCLs for PFAS

Michigan has joined a growing list of states that have lost patience with the EPA’s progress on setting a limit on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in drinking water. The EPA’s lack of action, says Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer, has compelled her to begin the process of completing a state maximum contaminant level (MCL) for PFAS […]

Drinking water

Bipartisan Support for Faster CERCLA Designation for PFAS

In its Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Action Plan, released in February 2019, the EPA noted that in 2018, it initiated the regulatory development process for listing the two most problematic PFAS—perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)—as hazardous substances under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund).

‘Groundbreaking’ PFAS Plan Floated by EPA

With considerable fanfare, including news conferences in every EPA region, the Agency unveiled its Action Plan for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a large class of manufactured chemicals that have proven to be highly effective in many industrial applications and have also spread risks to human health through sources of drinking water across the nation. […]

Molecule

Assess Your PFAS Risk Sooner Rather than Later

Are you holding off on assessing the risk of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) at your facility? Don’t wait until a regulator (or worse, legal action) forces your hand! A “wait and see” approach could result in a potential damage to your brand and investor relations.